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HDMI over cat5 - No problem!
#1
Anyone see this article? Looks pretty slick to me!

HDMI over IP

Chris
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#2
Wow! That really could be a game changer. It's not just your regular HDMI balun. The one device actually encodes the HDMI source into IP packets. The other device decodes them back into a HDMI signal. But the difference is that you can use a managed network switch as a sudo matrix switch. In other words, your decoder device can decode the signal from ANY of the encoders on the system. A regular balun is tied one decoder to one specific encoder.

The difference here is huge and might actually make HDMI switching stable and affordable.

Here is a diagram that was included in the linked article. It shows how the encoders and decoders are not tied to each other, but rather get routed through the managed network switch.
[Image: jap_schematic.jpg]
Brian - a long time user that rarely messes with the system now
Other systems used:
SageTV w/ cablecard tuner & multiple extenders for viewing
BlueIris and IP cameras for CCTV
Incredible PBX for home phone
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#3
Well, the reason they claim you need a 2960 is because the traffic is multicast. Multicast will run fine over a regular network, it would just be like one big broadcast to the whole network. The 2960 will basically filter that to just the ports that need it.

There are basically just a lot of caveats and complexities due to the constant broadcasting/multicasting of 60Mbps of traffic per stream. And BTW that is a compressed signal (h.264), HDMI is really around 2.8Gbps in it's raw form, so there is a LOT of information getting lost. On a typical 100Mbps network that 60Mbps would do a lot of damage.

You could put this on it's own network, either it's own switch or it's own VLAN if your switches are capable, or even put in a GB switch vs. buying an expensive 2960.

Just don't expect it to be simple. Maybe when GB or 10GB switches become more prevalent this will be more realistic for the average consumer.
Wuench
My Home Theater/Automation Website

[THREAD=5957]BlueGlass CQC Config[/THREAD]
[THREAD=10624]Wuench's CQC Drivers[/THREAD]
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#4
But in reality is there any current source devices that output a full 2.8gb/s? Regular OTA HD is around 20mbs, Satellite is lower than that, and even BlueRay is only like 60 Mbs. HDMI having a max bit rate of 2.8gbs is like saying gigabit networks have a max bit rate of 1000 Mbits/s. There aren't many (if any) consumer devices that can max out a gigabit network connection - just as there aren't (as far I as know) any consumer HDMI devices that actually max out the HDMI bitrate.

With the lower actual bit rates, a regular gigabit network (especially with a managed switch) should have no problem with that level of broadcast rates. At least that is how I understand the current world we live in. If I have my numbers wrong, please correct me.
Brian - a long time user that rarely messes with the system now
Other systems used:
SageTV w/ cablecard tuner & multiple extenders for viewing
BlueIris and IP cameras for CCTV
Incredible PBX for home phone
Reply
#5
That's all true, you don't actually use 2.8gbps, I am not sure if sound is included in that 60Mbps figure or these device. The point is the video is compressed, so it will be more like DTV's 1080p vs. BluRay's 1080p.

A GB network would be good, but 60Mbps is still a lot of broadcast that all your PC's and other devices would constantly have to examine and throw away, so YMMV.

I think the cheapest and best solution would be to put these devices on their own switch if possible. A cheap 100Mb one would probably work, no fancy (read expensive) features needed.

But a 2960 is overkill, there are also out-of-support cisco switches on ebay that would work. You basically just need a switch with and IGMP and VLANs to follow their recommendation of a network that supports other devices along with theirs.
Wuench
My Home Theater/Automation Website

[THREAD=5957]BlueGlass CQC Config[/THREAD]
[THREAD=10624]Wuench's CQC Drivers[/THREAD]
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#6
Very interesting indeed.
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#7
I would love to test these and see what number of pairs (TX;RX) the network could actually handel. Anyone written a driver to handel a managed switch from CQC, if anyone is going to, best to make sure that it is a current model and its back plate can handel at least 30Gbit as a thru put.
Its not my job to fix everything, just to get everything fixed.
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#8
Dell PowerConnect 2624 24-Port Gigabit Ethernet Switch

Ok price here in Europe, considering the specs.
Its not my job to fix everything, just to get everything fixed.
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#9
Also you have to be careful when talking backplane. Typically switches (even high end ones) have multiple ports on an ASIC chip. The backplane is only used to communicate between ASIC's. So ports 1-8, for example, might be sharing bandwidth, so you have to be careful which ports you pick. Backplane bandwidth is one of those marketing numbers and 30GB is probably way overkill.

I would recommend looking on ebay for older switches. Companies dump these all the time when they go out of support...

According to this
Quote:The signal routing to each end point can be adjusted by controlling the network switch VLAN configuration via RS-232 or Ethernet. If a client wants to add another PS3 to the system just add another Encoder and set it up on the network.
They just put the boxes on their own VLAN to control the stream. Which is totally stupid, IMHO. The fact that they use multicast means nothing, they mind as well just broadcast it. You just need a switch that supports VLANs. You might be able to control it via the SNMP driver.
Wuench
My Home Theater/Automation Website

[THREAD=5957]BlueGlass CQC Config[/THREAD]
[THREAD=10624]Wuench's CQC Drivers[/THREAD]
Reply
#10
Do you think the control needs to be for the switch or is it done at the decoder? Reading through the material I've seen I cannot tell. But I though the driver would tell the decoder which encoder's stream to pull and decode. I've thought that the managed switch was simply to help manager the higher network traffic. But I don't think you would need a driver to control the switch, rather you need one for the encoder/decoder. So one driver for the hardware would need to be written, not lots for all kinds of network switches.
Brian - a long time user that rarely messes with the system now
Other systems used:
SageTV w/ cablecard tuner & multiple extenders for viewing
BlueIris and IP cameras for CCTV
Incredible PBX for home phone
Reply


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