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CQC controlled Thermostats
#11
I am just using Cat5 wire for the RS485 runs. It is basically:
Computer (CQC Server) USB to Moxa
Moxa 485 to TR40 Controller (using Cat5 wire)

The Moxa driver on the computer can configure the Moxa ports to be either RS232, RS422 or RS485.

You can see my setup here.
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#12
what would be needed to do a simple 2 zone controlled by CQC?
tia, Ron

My HT equipment I want to control by CQC (some day hopefully)
Yamaha CX-A5100, Dune HD pro 4k, Dune HD Pro 4k plus, ISY 994i, LG 86" 4k FP, and a projector in the future
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#13
If you mean two seperate HVAC units, then a couple of TR40s or the cheaper TR16s should do it. They can both be connected to the same RS485 port.
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#14
I have 1 HVAC but would like to split the house in to 2 zones... one for upstairs and the other downstairs. That way we can only turn on the A/C upstairs when we are there.
tia, Ron

My HT equipment I want to control by CQC (some day hopefully)
Yamaha CX-A5100, Dune HD pro 4k, Dune HD Pro 4k plus, ISY 994i, LG 86" 4k FP, and a projector in the future
Reply
#15
Quote:I have 1 HVAC but would like to split the house in to 2 zones... one for upstairs and the other downstairs. That way we can only turn on the A/C upstairs when we are there.

if you have 1 physical "residential style" air handler, you're going to need automated Dampers placed in the duct leading to your 1st and 2nd floors. As mentioned above, the RCS TR40 is a great stat, in fact, the TR40 downstairs and an RCS TR16 upstairs would work great for your needs.

If you use the TR40's or 16's, i'd recommend just staying with RCS products for simplistic sake. For your zone control you'll need an RCS ZCV series mulizone controller and a minimum of 2 automated dampers the size of your ducts. take a look here for an explanation: http://www.resconsys.com/products/zonepanels/index.htm

if you're system does not have an atmospheric damper to automatically keep the static pressure balanced, then you'll want to look into is a barometric damper, also known as a bypass damper. again, i'd just stick with the same family of products and use an RCS Damper, if you go with RCS. a barometric damper simply routes the excess air back to the return of your air handler. avoiding the technical details of why it's important - right now your handler just blows air to both floors. if you pinch off half of that air because Zone 1 doesn't need it, it's going to try to go the other direction...your going to have issues. - the furthor from the air handler you can install this guy the better.

hope this helps
~~~ B01nk
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#16
Yep, for one HVAC, you go with the ZCV series, but instead of the TR40s, you go with the TS40 thermostats.

You can see what I did here.
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#17
The other thing you will see on my setup is that I went with MicroFlow registers for a couple of rooms since I could not get to the duct work. They replace the existing registers and you run plenum rated wire to them through the ducts.

I have not actually installed those two yet, but I have test them for actuation and they work just fine.

There is a review of them here.
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#18
pseigler Wrote:if you have 1 physical "residential style" air handler, you're going to need automated Dampers placed in the duct leading to your 1st and 2nd floors. As mentioned above, the RCS TR40 is a great stat, in fact, the TR40 downstairs and an RCS TR16 upstairs would work great for your needs.

If you use the TR40's or 16's, i'd recommend just staying with RCS products for simplistic sake. For your zone control you'll need an RCS ZCV series mulizone controller and a minimum of 2 automated dampers the size of your ducts. take a look here for an explanation: http://www.resconsys.com/products/zonepanels/index.htm

if you're system does not have an atmospheric damper to automatically keep the static pressure balanced, then you'll want to look into is a barometric damper, also known as a bypass damper. again, i'd just stick with the same family of products and use an RCS Damper, if you go with RCS. a barometric damper simply routes the excess air back to the return of your air handler. avoiding the technical details of why it's important - right now your handler just blows air to both floors. if you pinch off half of that air because Zone 1 doesn't need it, it's going to try to go the other direction...your going to have issues. - the furthor from the air handler you can install this guy the better.

hope this helps

How involved is this? Would one need the guy that installed the duct work in the first place to come back, or could I do it on my own?

Target
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#19
Target Wrote:How involved is this? Would one need the guy that installed the duct work in the first place to come back, or could I do it on my own?

Target

It entirely depends on how many zones you want, how accessible the ducting is, and how it was run...
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#20
Thanks for the info guys... I ended up ordering an Aprilaire 8870 and a Aprilaire 6404 4 zone controller for a little over $400 delivered ( I decided to go this route since I already had several pieces of Aprilaire and this hit the pocketbook very lightly).
tia, Ron

My HT equipment I want to control by CQC (some day hopefully)
Yamaha CX-A5100, Dune HD pro 4k, Dune HD Pro 4k plus, ISY 994i, LG 86" 4k FP, and a projector in the future
Reply


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