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Door locks and door video
#11
BI and CQC work well together - to a point.

BI can send MQTT or HTTP commands that CQC can react to - such as turning a light on when motion is detected.

I Use CQC to change the profile on BI. I set up Home, Armed Away, Armed Stay - basically replicated the alarm panel states. When the alarm is armed, CQC then tells BI to change profile.

I have a few other things I want to do - such as having CQC create a text file with some information (e.g. Outside Temp - 23°C) that BI then uses as an overlay on the image so when I view the camera I can get additional info.

We really need a driver for BI and CQC.

BI does supply a stream and I have integrated it into a page, so update though for the overview page and then a faster update on the individual camera page. I do need to add the ability to use VLC though instead now that its included. As indicated, using the CQC Web IV will require other workarounds that I have not gotten to yet.
Mykel Koblenz
Illawarra Smart Home
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#12
(10-15-2019, 12:30 PM)znelbok Wrote: I do need to add the ability to use VLC though instead now that its included.  As indicated, using the CQC Web IV will require other workarounds that I have not gotten to yet.

In order for it to work over WebRIVA, you have to convert the RTSP stream to an HTTP stream. You can view RTSP streams in the native IV.
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#13
I think BI or a similar system is probably the best way to self install a CCTV system. Using a third party propriety DVR to record a CCTV system seems limiting and expensive. In the end, both systems are simply computers recording the data streams from the cameras.

Another common way to integrate door stations is through an Asterisk or similar VOIP phone system. (I use Incredible PBX which is a free PBX software that utilizes Asterisk and a GUI to control it, but don't currently have any door stations). In reality you can probably do both. Have BI record any video stream and use Asterisk to handle the VOIP/intercom element.
Brian - a long time user that rarely messes with the system now
Other systems used:
SageTV w/ cablecard tuner & multiple extenders for viewing
BlueIris and IP cameras for CCTV
Incredible PBX for home phone
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#14
Well, I've wired all exterior doors with cat6 at a possible door station/doorbell/camera location just in case.

But the electric door strikes may be an issue. I was really set on that and started running wire when I realized actually getting wire to a strike would be very difficult or maybe impossible for a few of them. Those doors have side lights, transoms, and really no good way I can see to get a wire to a strike. In fact, the ones with sidelights may not even have enough thickness for an electric strike. Then there are the double/twin/French doors where the strike would be installed into the mating door. Beyond my skillset, I've put in an sos to the security company that ran wire for all door/window/motion sensors to see if they have tackled that before.
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#15
(10-09-2019, 09:29 AM)batwater Wrote: You can't go wrong with BlueIris but it does require a dedicated PC. For best video reliability run Ethernet cable for each camera. I have a POE switch located in my garage to handle the front of the house. The switch is fiber connected to a switch in my basement where the remaining cameras are connected. 

I have some antiquated 352x240 cameras that are sending signals and power via Cat5e.  I am looking to upgrade - can BlueIris be powered and also send a signal on a a single Cat5e?  Also, could you run the BlueIris software on the same computer where CQC runs, or does it have to be separate?  I am using the software Luxriot now, which can also be used with BlueIris cams to record the data stream.
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#16
Don't have either cqc or BlueIris installed and running real time so take this with that in mind, but the hardware requirements for BI appear to be well beyond those of cqc. Usually i5 to i7 range cpu's (includingany older generation models) are recommended.

If the computer was well equipped it may be fine running both, especially if the camera and/or resolution count was fairly low.

Some people build pretty high powered machines and then set up multiple VM's to run BI, media server, automation etc.
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#17
(10-22-2019, 09:42 PM)kblagron Wrote:
(10-09-2019, 09:29 AM)batwater Wrote: You can't go wrong with BlueIris but it does require a dedicated PC. For best video reliability run Ethernet cable for each camera. I have a POE switch located in my garage to handle the front of the house. The switch is fiber connected to a switch in my basement where the remaining cameras are connected. 

I have some antiquated 352x240 cameras that are sending signals and power via Cat5e.  I am looking to upgrade - can BlueIris be powered and also send a signal on a a single Cat5e?  Also, could you run the BlueIris software on the same computer where CQC runs, or does it have to be separate?  I am using the software Luxriot now, which can also be used with BlueIris cams to record the data stream.

I think there might be some misunderstanding...  BlueIris is a software based DVR package that runs on Windows.  As stated elsewhere for motion detection and some of the other functions BI is capable of you will need a fairly substantial computer.  The windows (either workstation or server) computer does not provide power to the cameras that is handled either via a POE switch (best choice, you can power cycle individual ports from the switch admin interface, I use Ubiquiti POE switches) or you can utilize an in line power injector. Given the CPU requirements it would not be practical to utilize a smaller POE powered PC to run BlueIris.  I have an I7 CPU with 32gb memory and 10tb disk storage. It is currently running around 72% cpu utilization with 6 IP cameras (2 are 4k 8mp) and 8 analog cameras. 

There are some tricks with BI where you can offload CPU intensive activities to the cameras if they are newer and high end enough. For example the location (camera) name / date and timestamp can be generated by the camera instead of BI as an overlay (there are other benefits to doing this like direct to disk recording) Another good CPU saver - motion detection can potentially be handled on the camera and a trigger message sent to BI to start/stop recording. BI also allows for the "pre-buffering" of video for a certain period of time such that when a motion detection event occurs (whether via BI or a motion trigger from a camera) the duration of the pre-buffer video is added in front of the motion event time. For example, I currently buffer 1 minute of video per camera such that I get the minute before the motion event and have it record 1 minute after the motion stops.  I have not yet applied these tricks to my setup. The buffer overlay change alone supposedly reduces CPU utilization by around 5% per camera. I need to spend some time validating this. I have to validate that the new IP cameras I am purchasing are capable of sending a motion event back to BI to trigger recording. 

I also have legacy analog cameras that are going on 12 years old now that feed into a 16 port video capture card.  I use a single cat5 cable for each camera running both power and video over the same cable. I have a 16 port CCTV power supply to power said cameras and media converters that convert the BNC connection at each end to wire lugs that 1 pair of the cat5 cable is connected to.  For the power I run 1 pair each (2 wires) for + and - power legs.  I am in the process now of replacing the 12 year old analog cameras with POE IP cameras.
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#18
Looks like electric strikes are out. Have a specialty hardware/locksmith company that does electric strikes often for commercial installs coming out to take a look and give a final judgement, but the combination of French doors, sidelights and transoms is probably just too big a hill to climb.

Will have to start looking at best of the worst (wireless) options.
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#19
You can do it:

https://www.assaabloyglass.us/Local/assa...atalog.pdf

Interesting options therein.
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#20
Not sure any of that would help. I mean, they are wooden doors but the amount of care and tedious time required to get wires where needed is way behind me (and I'll tackle almost anything).

These are not our doors but a decent approximation to give an idea. How do you get a wire to the edge of one door to act as a strike for the other?

https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/buildi...f_4953863/
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