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Has anyone deployed, or investigated deploying CQC in combination with a customizable on-screen display for overlaying on house televisions, for the purposes of navigating the OSD with a hand-held remote control and making selections?

Even though this is my first post here, I'm not a newbie and am aware of the other ways CQC can be interacted with such as via touchscreens, so no need to explain the advantages of those approaches.

Thanks
You can definitely do that. The interface viewer has a remote control interface that allows you to send it commands. Use whatever supported remote control scheme you want (RTI RP6 is a nice pro level one) and train CQC to send commands to the IV to move the focus around and make selections and so forth.
I assume I would use a video card to feed the IV into a Matrix switcher and in turn out to the televisions.

1. If I use a computer with multiple video cards, will CQC support multiple sessions, in this case two different IV's, so two different people can be navigating each one on two different televisions at the same time?

2. If the answer to #1 above is yes, can I write the necessary logic within CQC to serve up the two on a first come first serve basis? So that if someone goes into the family room and pulls up the on-screen viewer, they will grab one, and if then another person in the master bedroom calls for the OSD, the master bedroom automatically grabs the second one? So that they are not fighting each other by grabbing the same OSD?
1. In theory yes. There's only one mouse input, but since you aren't using the mouse input, then in theory that would work. Currently though only one IV wil run on a single machine, but that's an arbitrary limitation really, done because of the thought that generally there'd be no legitimate reason to run multiple instances. But that could be relaxed. You would have to use a command line option on each to make each one use a different port for the control interface.

2. I guess the real issue is, how do you figure out when one of them has stopped using it?
Dean Roddey Wrote:2. I guess the real issue is, how do you figure out when one of them has stopped using it?

The moment the user selected the OSD it would be considered "in use", and the moment they made any selection that indicated they were no longer using it (TV off, difference video source selected), it would no longer be considered in use. A timeout could also be employed based on the assumption that if an OSD is up longer than xx minutes someone walked out of the room and left it on.
You could certainly implement those sorts of decisions. If that's sufficient to get the logic right, I don't see any reason you couldn't do that.
Dean Roddey Wrote:You can definitely do that. The interface viewer has a remote control interface that allows you to send it commands. Use whatever supported remote control scheme you want (RTI RP6 is a nice pro level one) and train CQC to send commands to the IV to move the focus around and make selections and so forth.
I've also used a Universal Remote Control Inc. MSC400 and used a serial output to trigger actions, etc. in CQC. It worked very well. Very, very, very fast. One of the things I did with it was control a TV lift that had up, down pan left and pan right options. To eliminate the lift's lousy RF remote but retain the press and hold functionality of the pan movements (press and it pans until you let go of the button), I used a URC MX980. When the pan left or right buttons programmed into the 980 were pressed and held, I programmed a a single ASCII character out put, repeated every 100 ms. When CQC "saw" that ASCII character it would, in turn close a relay on a Global Cache GC100 connected to a dry contact input on the lift for 100 ms. Since the there was virtually zero lag between the close states of the relay, the lift saw it as a contact closure and would turn the TV. Let up on the remote's button and the whole routine ceased immediately. Though convoluted, it worked very well and I looked like an absolute genius to the home owner.
AnthonyZ Wrote:I've also used a Universal Remote Control Inc. MSC400 and used a serial output to trigger actions, etc. in CQC. It worked very well. Very, very, very fast. One of the things I did with it was control a TV lift that had up, down pan left and pan right options. To eliminate the lift's lousy RF remote but retain the press and hold functionality of the pan movements (press and it pans until you let go of the button), I used a URC MX980. When the pan left or right buttons programmed into the 980 were pressed and held, I programmed a a single ASCII character out put, repeated every 100 ms. When CQC "saw" that ASCII character it would, in turn close a relay on a Global Cache GC100 connected to a dry contact input on the lift for 100 ms. Since the there was virtually zero lag between the close states of the relay, the lift saw it as a contact closure and would turn the TV. Let up on the remote's button and the whole routine ceased immediately. Though convoluted, it worked very well and I looked like an absolute genius to the home owner.

That is very impressive solution. You may very well be an AV Einstein.
jpants Wrote:That is very impressive solution. You may very well be an AV Einstein.
Nope, just stubborn.
I'm doing the same thing with an MSC-400 and a couple of MX-880's. It's a real shame that no one makes an inexpensive RF reciever that will output serial strings and is compatible with the common RF remotes. We need a sort of WGL-800 for the A/V world. The MSC-400 works great, but it's an expensive solution just to act as a dumb RF to serial converter.