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Rain 8 with CQC?
#21
(02-20-2018, 04:38 PM)Dean Roddey Wrote: Honestly I'd prefer to put time into taking the existing irrigation driver and really integrating into CQC as a first class citizen, with a configuration interface in the AI, and running as a server instead of a driver and all that. Not that we couldn't also do a driver for Rain Machine, but being able to support generic gear and supporting good irrigation out of the box would be nice, particularly if it had a nice configuration interface.

Dean--Could you expand on this?  How is the existing irrigation driver not a first class citizen?  And if it were, what hardware would be used to connect CQC to the irrigation valves?

I am a total novice in this area, but as a potential buyer of CQC, I would personally like to see CQC support at least one or two really good integrated products in each of the major areas that people are interested in.  Like lighting (I think you have this with Radio RA2), irrigation, thermostats (I think you have Venstar here), pool control, and maybe a couple of more.  Ideally the integration would work like I understand the lighting does.  You can control the device from the device itself, or from CQC.  Rainmachine seems like the ideal device to be integrated.  From what I can tell Rain8 does not fit this mold.
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#22
I just meant that it's a device driver written by a third party. So it doesn't have a configuration interface in the Admin Intf, you configure by setting up a text file. I was just talking about making it something that we formally include in the product with a nice interface and all that.

BTW, there's also a driver for Irrigation Caddy, so that's something to look at as well. And it has a local interface also, no cloud required.
Dean Roddey
Software Geek Extraordinaire
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#23
I agree Dean - I think the irrigation driver is the better solution and just having basic drivers for any of the controllers on the market is my preferred solution.

That is one of the reasons why I always push the Click PLC - its just relays being controlled and its usually cheaper than the irrigation controllers and ultimately more versatile.

I was just pointing out that there was an API for the other controller so it was at least captured here on the forums should it be needed in the future.
Mykel Koblenz
Illawarra Smart Home
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#24
(02-20-2018, 05:28 PM)Dean Roddey Wrote: I just meant that it's a device driver written by a third party. So it doesn't have a configuration interface in the Admin Intf, you configure by setting up a text file. I was just talking about making it something that we formally include in the product with a nice interface and all that.

BTW, there's also a driver for Irrigation Caddy, so that's something to look at as well. And it has a local interface also, no cloud required.

So if I understand correctly, there is currently not a built-in irrigation driver with a nice graphical interface that can be displayed on a touch screen client?  How would I control my sprinklers from a touch screen or my phone?


(02-21-2018, 06:41 PM)znelbok Wrote: I agree Dean - I think the irrigation driver is the better solution and just having basic drivers for any of the controllers on the market is my preferred solution.

That is one of the reasons why I always push the Click PLC - its just relays being controlled and its usually cheaper than the irrigation controllers and ultimately more versatile.

I was just pointing out that there was an API for the other controller so it was at least captured here on the forums should it be needed in the future.

I'm confused about what you mean by a better solution vs. a preferred solution.  Which is better:  a good generic driver for CQC, or drivers that specifically work with various controllers?

If I use Click PLC, how can a contractor, neighbor, or visiting family member turn off my sprinklers?  What type of interface would I use to manipulate the PLC?
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#25
It is a combination of both. A good generic irrigation driver to manage the function of irrigation, scheduling rules/presentation, environmental rules, etc, and then separate drivers for specific irrigation controllers. The user interface is built in CQC using both the generic irrigation driver and the specific irrigation controller(s). What znelbok is talking about is providing 1 interface driver for irrigation control / management and hardware drivers for the many solutions on the market.

Using graphics cards in a Windows PC as an example, you have Windows and all of the video screen control functions that comes with for which there is a hardware abstraction layer. The individual graphics card manufacturers build drivers to translate between their hardware and the Windows hardware abstraction layer for graphics devices.

The touch screen would be one that you add, it's function could be dedicated specifically to irrigation or it could be more general purpose. As an example I believe several of the active users on the forum are testing out the use of Raspberry PIs with 7" touch screens. A very cost effective potential touch screen solution.
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#26
What I think you are missing here is how all this goes together.

There is an irrigation driver that sends commands to the driver for the actual device controlling the valves. This allows the user to use any hardware they want (M1, Rain8, ClickPLC, or any other relay device).

This puts all the smarts in the irrigation driver and the secondary 9slave) driver is a "dumb" driver.

So to answer your question, you create an interface on your touchscreen to interact with the irrigation driver and in the background it tells the driver for you valves to open and close as requried.

Test it out with the irrigation driver and a variable driver with a number of boolean field to replicate the number of stations you want touse.
Mykel Koblenz
Illawarra Smart Home
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#27
(02-22-2018, 11:44 AM)znelbok Wrote: What I think you are missing here is how all this goes together.

There is an irrigation driver that sends commands to the driver for the actual device controlling the valves.  This allows the user to use any hardware they want (M1, Rain8, ClickPLC, or any other relay device).

This puts all the smarts in the irrigation driver and the secondary 9slave) driver is a "dumb" driver.

So to answer your question, you create an interface on your touchscreen to interact with the irrigation driver and in the background it tells the driver for you valves to open and close as requried.

Test it out with the irrigation driver and a variable driver with a number of boolean field to replicate the number of stations you want touse.

Thanks for the clarification.  How would you control the PLC locally?
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#28
If you mean locally by standing in front of it you would wire in some push buttons or toggle switches of some sort. The PLC code would define what the switch does.

So if it was me, I would have a Local Auto switch. When in Auto CQC would have control, when Local the push buttons would either run a timer based sequence (no smarts, just like all irrigation controllers) an then maybe some buttons that just open and close valves while the switch is on.
Mykel Koblenz
Illawarra Smart Home
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